Tag Archives: carl sagan

5 Quotes that make Carl Sagan Unforgettable

sagan love quote universe

If you haven’t heard of Carl Sagan then you are missing out. Not only was the renowned astrophysicist a pioneering scientist, but a leader in the field of public science communication. And personally, one of the greatest people to have ever lived.

Without him, it is unlikely that many of us would know much about the universe beyond basic education. And without his television show Cosmosa generation of scientists may have never come to be.  But Carl’s greatest contribution to humanity was his unending patience, empathy and personal charge toward empowering people with knowledge.

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On his ‘ship of the imagination’, Sagan traversed the stars. Image courtesy of Flickr

Even now, his profound insights into human life ring true in arenas ranging from politics to social reform. So let’s count down our top list of his most enduring quotes, perhaps you will find something that you love.

1. On understanding and knowledge.

People are not stupid. They believe things for reasons. The last way for skeptics to get the attention of bright, curious, intelligent people is to belittle or condescend or to show arrogance toward their beliefs.

Throughout his career, Carl was persistent in his pursuit of public empowerment. By treating us all as friends, capable of the greatest feats, he established a paradigm of education by right.

sagan carl quote top 5 universe

Carl Sagan’s Universe was one we could all explore, and he tried to be the greatest guide. Image courtesy of Flickr.

But with some controversy, he took what was privy only to a select few in academia and made it not just palatable, but wondrous to the rest of us. For Carl, you were not just deserving of the universe but enriched for understanding it.

And as an avowed skeptic of common wisdom and conspiracy, he approached each subject with evidence, understanding, and compassion. Simply, he forgave people human mistakes, where others would simply dismiss them.

We should do the same.

2. On the transience of human life and the immortality of words.

One glance at a book and you hear the voice of another person, perhaps someone dead for 1,000 years. To read is to voyage through time.

During one episode of his poetic homage to humanity, Cosmos, Sagan visited the ancient library of Alexandria. It was here, for a short while, that the world’s greatest minds came together in a shared mission of understanding.

sagan quote books

Books are nothing less than a voyage of discovery, be they history. science or fiction. Our words stay behind when we leave. Image courtesy of Flickr.

And although much of Alexandria’s history was lost, small amounts remain in collected writings. An enduring legacy of another time. But for Carl words were more than just communication between friends and colleagues, but a version of immortality.

Through the written word we learned to overcome death, share the wisdom of our time with those who would come after. The ‘information-organism’ of humanity finds feet in ink over millennia.

3. On the fragility of understanding and the wonder of creation

If you wish to make an apple pie from scratch, you must first invent the universe.

In this short epithet, Sagan reflects on the vast gulf between human knowledge and the nature of the universe. And depending on your interpretation, he is either jocularly revealing a comedy of nature, or providing a deep insight into the linearity of thought.

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All that we are was formed in ancient furnaces. Including apple pie. Image courtesy of Flickr.

To make an apple pie requires the ingredients created from the formation of our universe. All that is once was in the bellies of ancient stars, cast into our universe and eventually mealtimes by cosmic forces and eons of time.

But to understand the world we must first invent a way of understanding, and for that the best we have is science. It is through a skeptic and imaginative mind that we may create our universe.

4. On the humility of human life in an infinite universe (see video.)

In his famous soliloquy, Sagan reduces human accomplishment, greatness, cruelty and misunderstanding to the tiny significance it has in the greater universe.

Within his poetic testament he not only shows us just how small we are, but hints at how pointless our self destruction is.

And at the same time he conveys a message of hope disguised in a eulogy. He warns us that our future is down to us, and that hopefully by realising what we have, as tiny as it is, that we may create a better future.

Earth is our only home.

5. On the saving grace of companionship.

For small creatures such as we the vastness is bearable only through love.

For all his poetry, lessons and foretelling, Sagan hits on something truly profound. Upon recognising the inescapable truths that are our mortality and ineffectual existence beyond a pale blue dot, he returns to what unites us all.

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In the infinite abyss of a dark universe hides rare moments of light and love. Image courtesy of Flickr.

By embracing love we can overcome any distance. And in that the paucity of meaning is rendered mute, bearable and even empowering, as through love we can find meaning in an ocean of irrelevance. Where science can bring humility, love can bring back purpose.

Throughout his career it appears to me that Sagan’s underlying driving force must have been a deep and powerful love for the universe and his fellow man. To continuously fight for public empowerment, against governments, critics and even himself, Sagan had a heart much greater than even his ‘ship of the imagination’ could explore

But to encapsulate Sagan in five quotes is impossible, so we encourage you to explore his work further.

So which was your favourite? What have we missed and what did you take away? Let us know in the comments below. And if you found yourself touched, please help us reach out  by sharing.

What’s next? Join our wonderful community!

The opinions expressed in this article are those of Dr Janaway alone and may not represent those of his affiliates. Featured image courtesy of Flickr.

R.I.P Carl.

Ten Incredible Pearls of Wisdom From Great Minds

ten wisdom dawkins

The world can be a confusing place, but academics, authors, artists, poets and philosophers are just some of the many who have tried to explain things. In my wanderings through scientific texts, popular non-fiction and and documentaries, there have been a few stand out comments.

Whether it be Malcolm Gladwell’s keen insight into human nature, or Carl Sagan’s prophetic view of the world, all have resonated in some way beyond comprehension. They seem intrinsically correct, and universally true.

So here are ten incredible pearls of wisdom from the great minds.

1. On The Origins And Nature Of Human Behaviour

‘Let us understand what our own selfish genes are up to because we may then at least have the chance to upset their designs.’ – Richard Dawkins, ethologist, evolutionary biologist and popular-science writer.

As the current face of evolutionary theory, Dawkins’ is no stranger to controversy. And although his work has revolutionised our understanding of the natural world, his opinions about how we must overcome our nature have caused the most conversation.

ten wisdom dawkins

The nature of life is conservative, selfish and driven by unconscious forces. Dawkins’ understands that to ‘be good’ you must understand our basic urges. Image courtesy of Flickr.

Dawkins’ is very aware how our evolutionary history, and how the selective pressures of the environment and each other, have shaped our behaviour. And in his book ‘The Selfish Gene‘, gives us to pause to consider the true morality of nature.

What is ‘natural’ isn’t inherently ‘moral’, and what we consider ‘moral’ is not inherently survival.  So Dawkins’ asks us to understand our primal natures if we are to best them.

2. On The Power Of Words

‘To acquire immunity to eloquence is of the utmost importance to the citizens of a democracy. ‘ – Bertrand Russell, Philosopher, Logician and Nobel Prize winner.

Although Russell is best known as a philosopher, his life of work reached deeper into the shared mind of society than we realise. By studying and writing on the academic disciplines of logic, mathematics and epistemology (the study of knowledge,) he became a strong advocate for peaceful societal reform.

A man’s words may make beautiful the macabre. Russell relied on logic to unify humanity toward a common good. Image courtesy of Flickr.

And most noteworthy are his observations of how people can be manipulated by words. The use of eloquent language, a flowery vocabulary or poetic arrangement can make the terrible seem empowering.  You need only read the words of Nazi spokesperson Joseph Goebbels to see how language can betray human decency.

We must understand a man’s motivation, and place it in the context of the sociopolitical climate, to truly understand what may be hiding behind the words.

3. On The Risks Of Virtue

‘Whoever fights monsters should see to it that in the process he does not become a monster. And if you gaze long enough into an abyss, the abyss will gaze back into you.’ – Friedrich Nietzsche, Philosopher, Author and culture commentator.

As the central reference to ‘Nihilism‘, Nietzsche examined the purpose of life without purpose. His infamous quote ‘God is dead‘ instilled the idea that the concept and role of any God is limited, and that through pain and suffering we may choose a virtuous path.

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Nietzsche warned us not to become monsters in the pursuit of greatness. Image courtesy of Flickr.

Whilst an avid skeptic of religion in general, his infamous parable ‘Thus Spoke Zarathustra‘ presented, in humbling terms, the true insanity of zealotry. He warns us not to lose ourselves in purpose, and to recognise how a belief in achieving ‘the good’ can lead to evil.

And in a world where popular influencers claim a moral authority, his words could not carry greater weight.

4. On The Importance Of Responsibility

‘Man is condemned to be free; because once thrown into the world, he is responsible for everything he does.’ – Jean Paul Satre, Philosopher.

Regarded by many as the father of ‘Existentialism‘, Satre believed that existence precedes essence, and that we must find our own way in a meaningless universe. But in accepting this freedom in action, we cannot ignore our role in what comes next.

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Satre  believed that with action comes responsibility, and with freedom comes the same. Image courtesy of Pixabay.

Many existentialists reject the concept of ‘good’ or ‘bad’ behaviour being an inherent natural motivation, and instead suggest that we make our decisions based on complex (although often incorrect,) contextual interpretations.

Not only does this mean we must be aware of our own limits, but take responsibility when they are exposed.

5. On The Stoicism Of Knowledge

The older I get, the more I understand that the only way to say valuable things is to lose your fear of being correct. – Malcolm Gladwell, Author and Journalist.

Famed author of ‘David And Goliath’, ‘Outliers‘ and ‘The Tipping Point‘, Gladwell explores the interconnectedness of humanity with the world around it. In his poignant prose he unravels what may seem miraculous, often challenging widely held beliefs.

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Gladwell has exposed and explained the hidden reasons behind cultural success and individual power. To question convention is as useful as it is risky. Image courtesy of Flickr.

His work tells us not only to dig deeper to explain the world, but that explanations may exist beyond the obvious. He also extols the value of expressing new ideas, fearlessly with no regard for your own ego.

We must challenge convention to find the truth, even if it risks our reputations.

6. On The Insights Given By Friendship

‘You can learn something about a person by the company she keeps.’ – Sam Harris, Philosopher and Neuroscientist.

Although more likely to be a figure of repute for his views on religion, Harris is a distinguished author and surveyor of the interface between neuroscience, morality and the world at large.

A fierce critic of authoritarian dogma, Harris asks us to take responsibility for building our knowledge toward creating a better world.

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Sam Harris is a vocal critic of authoritarian regimes and their numerous abuses. Image courtesy of Flickr.

He also asserts that morality itself exists independently of religious doctrine, and empowers a human approach toward a coalescence of society. And as a neuroscientist, he is all to aware of how our behaviour may make us, or betray our intentions.

So if  you want the measure of a man, consider who they value as friends.

7. On The Illusion Of Simplicity.

‘I think you’ll find it’s a bit more complicated than that.’ – Ben Goldacre, Physician and Author.

The namesake of his popular book tells us a lot about Ben Goldacre. An academic and scourge of pseudoscience and ‘folk wisdom’, Ben uses evidence to expose the lies many are sold by the few to the many. He also tells that what is made simple, or appears so, may not be.

wisdom goldacre bad science

Ben Goldcare makes it his mission to challenge misleading beliefs, expose bad science and explain the misunderstood. Image courtesy of Flickr.

What is claimed to simple may be complex, and what lies between may be inaccurate, underhanded and deliberate.

And with that, we should try to understand the motives behind simplification, and why it is so easy for us to be sold a lie. Amongst his many targets is Homeopathy and the risks involved in being misled.

8. On the Arrogance Of The Human Mind.

‘See that the imagination of nature is far, far greater than the imagination of man.’ – Richard Feynman, Theoretical Physicist, Nobel Prize winner and  Science Communicator.

Whilst it may seem odd that a theoretical physicist is so humble about uncertainty, Feynman shows us just how wonderful the universe is.

Although a pioneer in our understanding of the nature of our reality, he recognises that there is simply more we don’t know.

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Feynman studied and revealed some of the most hidden secrets of our universe, but in doing so realised that was is unknown is our greatest teacher. Image courtesy of Flickr.

The intricacies of our reality, currently hazy between the infinitesimally small and unimaginably large, appear to us through rigorous questioning and often teach us that our presuppositions are not just wrong,  revealing a drastic flaw in human understanding.

We claim to be intelligent, and yet this intelligence often blinds us to our own folly. We must revel in the wonder of whats left to wonder about, and not be afraid to look stupid doing so.

9. On The Value Of Choice And Humility

‘I was never born to write. I was taught to write. And I am still being taught to write.’ – Atul Gawande, Surgeon, Research and Author.

If you are a doctor, you no doubt are aware of Gawande. Whilst a strong advocate of evidence and comprehensive approaches, Gawande has also ventured into a philosophical musing of the human condition.

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As a surgeon, Gawande not only saves lives, but has taken it upon himself to understand what the true value of life is. Image courtesy of Flickr.

In his best-selling book, ‘Being Mortal’, Gawande examines the true value of human life, and what we lose and gain as we age. And true to his nature, he treats himself with a level of skepticism coherent with his humble world view.

We are born with a choice in a difficult world, expertise is only a measure of dedication tempered by self criticism, and arrogance undermines greatness.

10. On The Size Of Our Influence

‘The Earth is a very small stage in a vast cosmic arena.’ – Carl Sagan,  Astronomer, Astrophycist and Pulitzer Prize winner.

To reduce the works of Sagan to one sentence would vastly sell him short. Not only did he lead the way in popularising science, but housed a mind so in tune with the human condition that his loss is truly universal.

Having inspired legions of scientists, including protege Neil deGrasse Tyson, Sagan’s holistic approach to science and its delicate implications toward society rings as true today as it did years ago.

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Carl Sagan was not just a pioneer of knowledge, but arguably one of humanity’s greatest teachers. Image courtesy of Flickr.

He was exceptionally kind, humble and patient, expressing the very tenets he postulated as a universal ideal.

Sagan reminds us that the true beauty of the universe is not just in its nature, or its creation, but in our pursuit of explanation and the inherent ability to use this knowledge to better ourselves and future generations.

And that perspective matters, for the universe is much greater than such complex molecular machines as we. We are so very small, but in that there is much to be learned, gained and valued.

So Much Left To Learn

Ten quotes simply isn’t enough to even scratch the surface of the grand insights accumulated in the wealth of human knowledge, or beyond it. And with each quote, you may have taken your own interpretation of meaning and purpose.

Perhaps you disagree with some, or worry that they are incongruent with each other. But I am willing to contend the opposite, that each shares a unity in placing the pursuit of knowledge through humility, truth and beneficence as a true virtue.

So what are your favourite quotes? What and who has changed your life? Let us know in the comments. And if you believe, like I do, that knowledge is best shared, then help us by sharing this article with your friends and family.

What’s Next?

The opinions expressed in this article are those of  Dr Janaway alone and may not represent those of his affiliates. Featured image courtesy of Flickr.

Note from the Author: Upon writing this article I became very aware of just how much I don’t know, and how much I can learn. I feel it only right to follow up on this article with more information about the works and lessons of the persons featured. There are many greats not featured on this list, but don’t worry, I will find ways to include them. I do not value my opinion of what is great  above any others, I only wish to signpost what is already there.

Is The Cosmos Truly Empty? Are We All There Is? Inside; We Answer Humanity’s Most Uncomfortable Question.

The Universe is much more vast than we can imagine. It has been expanding for over 13.8 billion years,  and some of the very light we observe in the night sky is older than earth itself. And with simple life easy to assemble, and the vast numbers of planets out there, we are forced to wonder. Are we alone? And if not, where is everybody? Well the answer is fascinating, and in some cases, quite terrifying indeed.

“I’m sure the universe is full of intelligent life. It’s just been too intelligent to come here.” – Arthur C. Clarke, Futurist and Writer.

The Fermi Paradox and Kardashev Civilisations

‘In space, no one can hear you scream’ – Alien, 1979

The paradox posed by the apparent absence of intelligent life is called ‘The Fermi Paradox‘. According to the ‘Drake Equation‘, a mathematical prediction of the number of intelligences out there, there should be at least 100,000 species with advanced civilisations.

To speak of ‘Advanced’ civilisations we must first define them. The Kardashev Scale helps us to understand civilisations by their level of energy use. To summarise it quickly, the higher the number, the more advanced the technology and greater the chance the species can travel across the Universe:

  • Type 0: Fails to completely harness power of local planet (us!)
  • Type 1: Harnesses power of local planet (interplanetary species.)
  • Type 2: Harnesses power of local star (interstellar species.)
  • Type 3: Harnesses power of resident galaxy (intergalactic species.)

Alongside the energy use and travel, each jump up the ladder is presented with new challenges. And part of this challenge is why we may not see life out there. With earth relatively young (4.5 billion years or so old,) and the universe so vast, some species may have billions of years head start. So why don’t we see intergalactic fleets? Where is the hidden message from the stars?

We approach the great filters.

Great Filters Of Life

“I felt a great disturbance in the Force, as if millions of voices suddenly cried out in terror and were suddenly silenced.” – Obi Wan Kenobi, Star Wars IV

A ‘Great Filter‘ is a concept designed to explain the paucity of life in the Universe. It is a barrier to a species survival, and its nature is variable dependent on time. And depending on where in the species’ life it appears, it could easily explain our cosmic quandary. And if its happens late, offers a stark warning.

If a filter is early, say, at the transition from single celled to multicellular life, then we have done very well. We have overcome the major universal hurdle. But it also means that intelligent and complex life is exceedingly rare, and conversely single celled life could be everywhere. And given the distance of our nearest stars, and the time period we have been looking, chances are that us spotting another species is pretty much zero.

They are either very far away and their signals or ships have not reached us yet (consider that even at light-speed our nearest star is 10,000 years away,) or something else has claimed them in the mean time. They could have existed 10 billion years ago, and simply died out in a quiet corner far away.

The second most discussed time for a great filter is the transition from a type 0 to type 1 civilisation. At this time a species is likely playing with very dangerous energies, but still subject to internal warfare, religious zealotry and nationalism. It may very well be that no one ever gets this far, as they blow themselves up before they can. Who knows how many potential galaxy faring species have been wiped out in their own nuclear war?

I mean look at us, the leader of the free world is goading a nuclear power with Tweets.

Lost In Transition

“Can there be any question that the human is the least harmonious beast in the forest and the creature most toxic to the nest?”  – Randy Thornhorn, Author.

For us as humans, this is quite concerning. If the great filter is placed here, and the universe is silent, then our chances are pretty low. If in the whole of space time, given even the most restrictive metrics, we hear nothing, then it means most species cannot survive becoming a Type 1 civilisation. We assume here that the transition between 1-2, or 2-3, is easier as war is less likely. But yet, we see nothing to reassure ourselves.

It says something quite profound about intelligence. If life cannot readily pass this transition, it means that intelligence hits a wall. The intraspecies dynamics are too complicated to allow for general progress. The stupid wins out. Its not hard to imagine a far off civilisation annihilating itself over resources, religion or power struggles.

We are judgemental, prone to violence, capricious and short-sighted. If we imagine any of these species to behave like us, it tells a sad story.

But Have Hope

The Great filter only talks about survival, not intent and behaviour. The Universe could be teeming with intelligent life, but we haven’t seen it yet. And there could be good reasons for that.

Perhaps ‘they’ are already here, but we cannot see them. This could be because we simply don’t know what we are looking for. Radio waves are pretty simple, and an advanced species may have moved onto something more reliable. Our skies could be filled with alien messages, ranging from the profound to intergalactic cable, and we would have no idea.

They may not want to see us. Maybe they will only talk with Type 1+ civilisations, because anything less is a waste of time or dangerous. We wouldn’t extend a hand to a lion, so why would they consider us any better? We haven’t proved we can be peaceful even amongst ourselves.  An alien species would consider this option very seriously.

Or perhaps it simply isn’t worth it. Travelling interstellar distances takes generations of time and is likely very costly, and what can we offer? New technology, unlikely? Resources? Its probably cheaper to mine local asteroids. Philosophy, art, music? Perhaps, but what intergalactic government will commission an art research grant tantamount to a million year field trip?

Are We Alone?

‘The universe is a pretty big place. If it’s just us, seems like an awful waste of space.” – Carl Sagan, Contact

Given what we know about the Universe, it seems very unlikely. Simple molecular life is probably not uncommon, but the absence of intelligent life is less reassuring. We may indeed be heading toward a fiery fate, or perhaps will be the first interstellar species out there. One day we might bypass Voyager 1 and say ‘Hello’ to ET first hand (or claw,) but for now it doesn’t seem too likely.

But don’t take it too hard. The Universe is grand, time long and life likely easy. There may be something out there, asking just the same questions. And one day, with a smidge of luck, we can answer those questions for them. Unless we decide to blow them up.

What’s Next?

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  • Learn more about great filters in this handy video by Kurzgesagt

The opinions expressed in this article are those of Dr Janaway alone and may not represent those of his affiliates. Image courtesy of Robert Sullivan

Sources

The above sources are true as of 18/3/17. If you would like to discredit them, feel free. It brings us closer to the truth, and I can always cry about it later.

 

Ever Wondered Who You Are? Stop Waiting And Find Out.

You are a human. One of billions alive today, and one of many more that have passed on. You are built of biological tissues that work harmoniously to stay alive, requiring energy to remain altogether, reproduce and, eventually, die. Given the apparent silence of the Universe (where are all the aliens?!) our type of ‘complex life’ seems very rare indeed. But who are you? Where did you come from? And where the hell is everyone else?

Genesis

In the beginning, God created the heavens and the earth – Genesis 1, The Holy Bible (New International Version.)

Whether you believe in God or not, the Universe had a beginning (or atleast a defined start to its current iteration.) Big Bang or Simulation, we are 13.8 billion years (or a few thousand if you are religious,) into its life. The Earth came into being around 4.5 billion years ago, likely due to the accumulation of interstellar particles under gravity. And this seems common, in the known universe planets number in the many trillions.

From this perspective, we are not that special. There are trillions of planets in a huge Universe (possibly one of many.) But, there is something that sets us apart (clue, its you.)

Molecules And Man

Man is the only creature who refuses to be what he is’ – Albert Camus, Novelist, Playwright and Essayist

Over our relatively short stage-time (a tiny fraction of what the Universe will likely live before becoming an entropic, cold wasteland,) Earth has been home to something truly spectacular. Life. Whether it be the pet project of a deity (which Science would lead you to disregard,) or something to do with molecular replication, you cannot deny that it is special. Why? Because we haven’t seen it anywhere else (yet!)

Current theories propose that certain molecular configurations of highly reactive atoms (carbon, hydrogen, oxygen and nitrogen,) began to replicate due to their increased stability and preferential ability to induce change in free atoms floating near by. If you have studied biology, its a little like the ‘induced‘ reaction of enzymes. But on a simple level, becoming more complicated over time.

‘We are all survival machines, but ‘we’ does not mean just people’ – Richard Dawkins, The Selfish Gene

Chances are that this type of life is fairly common, as given the large numbers of planets out there, even with a tiny fraction of chance, some would have created the same tiny ‘creatures’ (if you will.) It may very well be that we spot such simple life on Saturn’s moon of Titan, or deep in Martian rock (and some suggest we already have!)

But when did these collections of molecules become more complex? And how? The symbiotic theory suggests that large molecules engulfed smaller to create the first eukaryotes (i.e. multicellular organisms,) which then coalesced to create those with different systems. These were ‘biological’, and relied on interactions between different parts to stay ‘alive’.

Evolution, the scientific theory that attempts to explain life, makes two strong points:

  1. Individual variation in a species will occur by chance (i.e when our genes replicate, they make mistakes, giving a different appearance, behaviour or some other trait.)
  2. If this individual variation is ‘adaptive’, i.e it means it will benefit the individual and species overall, it will likely become predominant in the species (sounds a bit like the molecules right?)

TLDR: Humans are just the current species specific iteration of a long chain or organisms. Cue the book burning.

Something Special (?)

Is mankind alone in the universe? Or are there somewhere other intelligent beings looking up into their night sky from very different worlds and asking the same kind of question? – Carl Sagan, Astrophysicist, Turtle-Neck Enthusiast.

So likelihood is we are the end result of endless generations of molecules, subject to evolutionary pressures and bound by the physical laws of the universe, slowly becoming more and more like us (and other creatures.) But this seems entirely natural, and almost inevitable.  But we don’t see it everywhere in the universe, and this is called the Fermi Paradox.

Actually, The Drake equation suggests that given even restrictive rules, there should be at least 100,000 to  15 million civilizations out there. Even with modifications, we should still see thousands.

SETI (the Search for Extra-Terrestrial Intelligence,) is a large array of radar dishes scanning the cosmos. It is pointed toward areas of interest, looking for radio waves from far-flung civilisations. These scientists look for certain signals, such as familiar universal numbers, primes, repeating patterns or something else irregular.) So far, aside from the WOW signal, nothing particularly special has turned up.

We seem to be alone.

But are we really? The Universe is very old, and the laws governing what we understand life needs aren’t very forgiving. We need a certain gravity, heat, energy and abundancy of atoms, time and space. The chances are that even with this caveat, life is out there. But we may never see it, and there are reasons why (stay tuned.)

Who Are You?

For now, when you ask yourself who you are, muse on our shared history. Don’t worry so much about social labels, age or race. If you dare, ignore species altogether. The answer is very humbling and can be expressed in one sentence.

You are a biomass of self-believing consciousness, built from familiar atoms under restrictive universal laws, tuned by selective environmental pressures, and just a small part of something much beyond your comprehension.

And that, for me at least, is pretty freeing.

What’s Next?

  • Follow Ben on Twitter so you never miss an article.
  • Give this a share if you found it interesting.
  • Let me know what you think in the comments below or on social media.
  • Donate. Running this blog requires coffee.
  • Learn more about our history by reading Bill Bryson’s ‘A Short History of Nearly Everything.’ (Seriously, do it!)

The opinions expressed in this article are those of Dr Janaway alone and may not represent those of his affiliates. Image courtesy of Felix Jody Kirnawan

Sources

The sources above are true as of 17/3/18. Feel free to discredit them, it only brings us closer to the truth. My feelings won’t be hurt.

 

 

 

Do You Want To Understand The Universe? It Can Be As Simple As This. Inside; Become An Internet Explorer

The twilight hours are a funny place. Roald Dahl referred to them in his classic novel ‘The BFG’ as ‘The Witching Hours.’ And when the shadows grow long, and the night sky becomes lost to the horizon, the world can seem just that, bewitching. And at these times of magic I often find myself amongst the stars, or deep in our past, or between the very particles that made us. I am talking of learning, using the internet to discover the universe.

And it is the best decision that I have ever made. Becoming an #internetexplorer

Once we lose our fear of being tiny, we find ourselves on the threshold of a vast and awesome Universe which dwarfs — in time, in space, and in potential — the tidy anthropocentric proscenium of our ancestors.” – Carl Sagan, Astrophysicist and Science Communicator

Committing to the Universe

As I write this blog I am also watching ‘Vsauce‘, a Youtube channel dedicated to educating on subjects ranging from physics to psychology. The host Michael Stevens is an enigma, seemingly a deft hand with everything and yet almost always entranced. Mathematics, physics, the human mind, he can dance between them seamlessly. And its with that dance that I find a clue to our universe, it is all interlinked.

‘Somewhere, something incredible is waiting to be known’ – Carl Sagan, Astronomer and Science Communicator*

As I sit here writing, Stevens is discussing his desk and how it reflects the inner workings of his mind. It is a mess. I can relate. But on it is a globe, little puzzles, endless notes and most importantly, a computer. Information, unrestricted and potentially near infinite. And though his channel Collins is able to inspire me.  By committing to learning, you begin to know the universe and your place in it.

“For me, I am driven by two main philosophies: know more today about the world than I knew yesterday and lessen the suffering of others. You’d be surprised how far that gets you.” – Neil deGrasse Tyson, Astrophysicist and Science Communicator

Our pale blue dot as a bridge

Humans, as hailed as polymath Carl Sagan says, are ‘Johnny come-latelys’ to the universe. On our ‘pale blue dot‘, as he put its, we have acted out every good, bad and in-between of our history. And yet, this is a small time, a tiny snippet of the cosmic calendar. But, even in this sliver, we have learned more about our universe than anyone could have possibly imagined just 100 years ago.

The true virtue of human existence has always been wonder. When our distant ancestors glanced upward at the stars they saw great hunters, prey and predators cast amongst them. Little did they know that they were giving our meaning on giant balls of nuclear fusion so far away that the very light was older than they. They used tools, sharp stones, that would one day become surgical knives and the precursors to lasers that could split subatomic particles.

We tell stories of the universe, but the universe has infinitely more to tell us.

Our questions have always moved us forward. And our little blue dot, lost in a tiny corner of the cosmos, is our bridge to the universe. And you can cross it any time, all you need do is ask. And the solution is on Michaels desk, and yours, or in your hands, a computer (big or small.)

Become an explorer

Your brain, the centre of your universe, floats in a body of fluid called ‘Cerebrospinal Fluid.’ It is full of nutrients, and protects the brain from impacts as we go about our day to day. Without it, we would be in big trouble. But exploring is important, life is a necessity once born, but adventure a calling. It is using this brain we can truly venture forth.

If you want to truly know the universe it has never been easier. Simply by opening up a search bar,  you can learn about anything. But I am going to suggest another way. Begin an adventure. After spending a year travelling, I learned to follow my passions, and the path becomes unpredictable.

Chaos theory, the science of unpredictability, helps to model the interactions of the many on their outcome. When it comes to adventure this means that you may never know where you end up. So start here, and type in any word you want. I suggest ‘String Theory’. Then watch the first thing, then click on the next, follow your mind and keep going.

You have now become an #explorer of knowledge, and with it, the universe.

What’s next?

  • Read Richard Dawkins, Carl Sagan and Sam Harris
  • Share YouTube videos that interest you and tell others why
  • Keep a ‘Learning Diary’ by noting new fascinating things

Image courtesy of Pixabay

*To label Carl Sagan, or his protégé Neil deGrasse Tyson, with such restrictive terms is somewhat painful. Both are more than scientists, storytellers or artists. They are something else, pioneers. In fact, Carls messages may be the first to be read in deep space by another species… but that’s for another day.

The views above represent those of Dr Ben Janaway and none of his affiliates. Please subscribe and follow him at @drjanawayHe is happy to discuss any work or commissions.