Category Archives: Psychiatry

Search Engine Data May Help Diagnose Depression Earlier

A new study published in JMIR Mental Health has revealed that searches relating to Depression and its treatment spike at different times of the day. The data shows that searches around depression peak between 11pm and 4am daily, showing a clear focus overnight. The reason for this isn’t immediately clear but may tell us more about the day to day lives of patients. With depression a growing problem, these insights may help us to recognize depression earlier. And, with that, to help people access treatment.

Depression and Diurnal Variation.

It is common knowledge that the symptoms of depression vary in severity over the day. The classical picture of waking up ‘sad’ and ‘feeling better’ later is one of just many. But little has been done to actually quantify this in real terms over a large population. The researchers reviewed search data of key terms around ‘depression’ to elucidate a pattern. They found four peaks between 11pm and 4am, and relative ‘troughs’ between 5am and 10pm. Essentially, people were trying to learn more about depression and take ‘online tests’ during the night.

depression data diurnal medicine

Depression is a common and difficult problem. Data may help earlier diagnosis and treatment. Flickr.

It’s hard to directly claim what this may mean without considering multiple factors. The first is the simple issue of time availability, with daily work commitments limiting free time to search. The second is that more people are likely to sit on computers overnight, increasing the likelihood of searching for anything.  However, the team’s statistical analysis shows a clear difference between searches at different times, suggesting something significant. What this may mean in actuality will require further study. But it could be very useful information indeed.

Why May People Search For Depression At Night?

Aside from the reasons discussed above, it may be that this pattern is well explained by what we already know. Depression is known to be associated with anxiety and sleep disturbance. We also know that with depression, in many cases people feel better later in the day. It is very possible, with a number of assumptions, that the combination of these two factors may explain the findings. If people feel more energized later in the day and overnight, and cannot sleep due to their symptoms, there would be peaks in activity. The data would seem to support this idea.

depression sleep diurnal data diagnosis

Depression is associated with sleep problems. Flickr.

However, further research is needed to compare these findings with the actual patients themselves. It would not be fair to assume without more supporting evidence. The data itself does not reveal whether those looking for ‘depression’ related information were actually suffering from depression, suspicious of being depressed, or simply interested in the condition. There is a lot of conjecture. But what the study does provide is strong evidence that people are more active in learning about depression at night.

Given what we know about depression, this may provide a new way of recognizing depression in the undiagnosed, and helping to monitor treatment success in patients.

A New Way Forward

Depression is a growing problem and early intervention is key in its treatment. This new data shines light on the daily lives of patients and the undiagnosed. It may be that recognizing the patterns tells us not only more about the nature of depression but could provide an early warning system for those at risk. But how this may work in practice is another question altogether. The first step may be interviews with those concerned, establishing the nature of their condition. Only then could a suggestion be made that ‘search engine’ data be instrumental in earlier diagnosis.

So what do you think? Could search engine data help doctors diagnose depression earlier? Are you concerned about privacy? Is there a happy medium between? Let us know in the comments.

What’s Next?

  • Learn more about Depression and why early diagnosis is best.
  • Follow Ben on Twitter so you never miss an article from drbenjanaway.com

The opinions expressed in this article are those of  Dr. Janaway alone and may not represent those of his affiliates. Featured image courtesy of Flickr. If you are concerned about your health please see your local healthcare provider. Sources available within main text via hyperlinks. If you find new information that contradicts this article, or feel that an error has been made, please do let me know via benjanaway@outlook.com. I will be happy to hear from you. 

 

 

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Why Do We Worry So Much? Turns Out, Its Nature Falling Behind. Inside; The Science Of Anxiety.

There are times when I feel that the world is exploding around me. My heart is racing, hands shaking and breath hard to catch. Often there is no clear reason for these symptoms, or the panic that rushes through my brain. Other times I find myself unable to sleep, and as I watch the hours pass in the twilight hours I wonder why I feel like this. But the answer is something common to us all, Anxiety.

“To venture causes anxiety, but not to venture is to lose one’s self…. And to venture in the highest is precisely to be conscious of one’s self.” Soren Kierkegaard

So what is Anxiety, what does it feel like and how can we live with it? I teamed up with Metro journalist and Mental Health Advocate Hattie Gladwell to get to the bottom of it.

What is Anxiety?

Anxiety is a term used to describe the symptoms of a number of ”Mental Health” conditions ranging from ‘Generalised Anxiety Disorder‘ through to specific phobias. These can include agoraphobia (fear of being out of a safe place.) It can also include such things as ‘Panic Attacks’ and be linked to conditions such as Obsessive Compulsive Disorder.

Really it represents a whole spectrum of conditions where the world can be uncomfortable to the point of disease. The official definition given by the ICD-10 (a national registry of disease,) reads like this;

‘A category of psychiatric disorders which are characterised by anxious feelings or fear often accompanied by physical conditions associated with anxiety’

A rather less than elucidating definition. But what does Anxiety actually feel like?

What does Anxiety feel like?

“I am exhausted from trying to be stronger than I feel.” -Unknown (source: paintedteacup.com)

Dr Google will tell  you many symptoms, but it seems that the experience of anxiety is very individual. At the centre of it is worry, which can be accompanied by physical symptoms. These symptoms, if clustered together, can present a ‘syndrome’, which can lead to a specific diagnosis. This is all rather complex, and without seeing a doctor, self-diagnosis is dangerous. But we aren’t here to talk about specific types, but what it can feel like to live with it.

‘I have health anxiety, its all or nothing. I will get a surge in adrenaline, hot and cold flushes, shaking.  It happens more when I’m isolated and have more time to think about it. Most days I am panicking that my whole life will be put at hold.’

For me the experience is not entirely different. As a patient of depression, I consider anxiety (a well recognised association of depression,) as an uneasy partner. For me the problems started young, fear of making a fool of myself in front of friends, or fear of being disliked. Over time this changed, and my concerns became focussed on relative fame, (if you could call my experience that,) of being judged by others for my words and opinions.

I promise you nothing is as chaotic as it seems. Nothing is worth diminishing your health. Nothing is worth poisoning yourself into stress, anxiety, and fear’  – Steve Maraboli

This may seem silly to some, but I have had panic attacks after tweeting. I have stayed up for hours refreshing a timeline, worrying what others may say. These feelings have become more general, to a point where a phone call from an unrecognised number begins a spiral. Its uncomfortable, draining and often completely unnecessary, For me anxiety is a terrible affliction that seems bizarre later.

Living with Anxiety

If you suffer from unhelpful feelings of anxiety or catastrophic thinking, your Chimp is in control. – Dr Steve Peters, Psychiatrist 

Anxiety, for many, is a lifelong problem. Depression has its ‘Black Dog’ (mine is named, and I have grown kind to it,) but Anxiety may need a different animal. You can pick yours, but mine can be a Vulture. Treatment is difficult, but there is great success in Cognitive Behavioural Therapy  and medication. These treatments recognise the problem as a system of thought, action, reaction and behaviour.

By identifying your own, and making adaptions, you can begin to recognise when you are being taken over and do something about it. In his best selling book ‘The Chimp Paradox‘, Psychiatrist Steve Peters describes these feelings as being hijacked by ‘The Chimp’, an analogy for the emotional centre of the brain.  By recognising this, and through several techniques, Peters believes that you can take back control.

It is a great book, so give it a read.

Interestingly, these ideas are not new. In fact, Neuroscientist Sam Harris has discussed the overlap between neurocircuitry, religion and spirituality at length in his book ‘Waking Up.’ It is a big subject, but it may be that ancient religions, such as Buddhism, have already figured out how to deal with the pressures of the world by reconsidering their significance.

‘I am undergoing CBT, which I am finding very helpful. I use apps, but they aren’t a cure, but can be short term relief. They help me calm down. I tell myself that although things are horrible right now, it will pass’ – Hattie 

So if you are like me, there is hope.

If you enjoyed this article and would like to discuss it, or pitch ideas for follow ups, follow me on twitter or email me at benjanaway@outlook.com. I am happy for this work to be reposted, just let me know if you do!

What’s Next?

The views above are those of Dr Janaway alone and do not necessarily represent those of his affiliates. They should not be taken as medical advice. If you are concerned about your health please access your local health provider. Please feel free to follow Dr Janaway on twitter. Image courtesy of Pixabay.